One Week Cruise in the Galápagos

One Week Cruise in the Galápagos

I can’t believe I have the honour of writing my experiences down for this epic journey we’ve undertaken. Although I’ve been traveling the world pretty much my entire life, getting to spend a week on a yacht exploring the Galápagos might just be one of the most surreal trips I’ve ever had the chance to be on.

It was my dad’s 60th birthday this year and he loves boats so mum and I, when scheming up a cool birthday idea, decided to pull out an old itinerary I had prepared for Ecuador and the Galápagos (back in the same year we ended up going to Sri Lanka). I found myself on my laptop, researching various cruise options through the exquisite archipelago on the equator in the Pacific Ocean, trying to figure out what time of year we could go, which islands we wanted to visit and arranging the trip of a lifetime.

That was back in March - fast forward to late July and I’m spending the night sitting on the floor in Munich airport waiting to check in, while my parents are simultaneously flight-hopping from San Francisco to San Salvador to Bogotá, with all three of us landing within a few hours of each other at Quito International Airport in the heart of Ecuador.

It’s my first time in South America and we’ve really set the bar high; this country is incredible. It’s small enough to see the highlights in a short timeframe but bursting with variety and exquisite landscapes, vibrant culture, delicious food and kind people.

After our first few days exploring Quito and the dreamy landscapes of the southern national parks, we boarded our Avianca flight first to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s second largest city, and then out across the ocean; destination: Galápagos.

From the moment we landed, the trip felt like a dream. These islands are visited by so few people and in such a regulated manner so as to preserve the nature of one of the world’s greatest natural preserves that getting to actually be here in person is a privilege.

jana meerman quito plane view

Flying out of Quito

jana meerman quito plane view

Flying into the Galápagos


WHICH COMPANY TO VISIT THE Galápagos WITH?

We spent a week cruising through ten of the nineteen islands in the Galápagos aboard Coral I with Go Galápagos Tours – the sister ship, Coral II, sailed alongside us following the same itinerary. Coral I has space for thirty passengers, whereas Coral II fits twenty, so the groupings while on the various islands undertaking all the different activities is intimate. There is a guide per every ten people and these guides are exceptional. They are predominantly locals, most of them born and raised in the Galápagos and using their wealth of experiences from a lifetime spent exploring and understanding these islands, are sharing them with those of lucky enough to spend time with them.

We booked our tour through Andean Trails, based in the UK. The company running Coral I and II is called Go Galapagos, owned by Klein Tours. You can book them through various agencies.

There is the option to stay in a hotel on Santa Cruz Island in Puerto Ayora and take day trips from there to the various islands. We chose the option of a cruise as we were able to reach many more of the islands and more remote parts of the archipelago, given that the boat is sailed overnight to each new destination.

jana meerman coral 1 go galapagos

Arriving to Coral I

jana meerman frigate galapagos

We were greeted aboard by the first of many frigate birds


WHAT IS IT LIKE TO GO ON A CRUISE IN THE Galápagos?

A cruise in the Galápagos is most certainly not a relaxing holiday. These holidays are designed for active people to get out in nature, exploring the diverse landscapes and environment of the archipelago. I cannot speak for other boats, but on Coral I and II, we really only used the boats for sleeping, eating and traveling between islands.

Most days had four activities: two in the morning between breakfast and lunch, and two in the afternoon before dinner, looking something like this:

  • 7:30am – breakfast
  • 8:30am – activity 1
  • 10:00am – activity 2
  • 11:30am – back on board
  • 12:30pm – lunch
  • 3:00pm – activity 3
  • 4:30pm – activity 4
  • 6:00pm – back on board
  • 7:00pm – dinner
  • 8:30pm – briefing for next day

Activities ranged from small walks, longer hikes, panga (dinghy) rides exploring the coast, snorkelling either off the beach or off the panga and visiting animal reserves (e.g. tortoises, Darwin’s research station).

Each day was jam-packed, with early rises and long days. I went to bed completely exhausted most before 10pm and we would then spend the nights being cruised to our next destination - sometimes this meant a smooth gentle rocking to sleep, other nights it was a bit rough, and we were thrown about our beds!

jana meerman panga ride galapagos

A sunset panga ride back to our boat


RULES IN THE Galápagos

You cannot visit any of the islands in the Galápagos without a guide, due to the fragility, sensitivity and sheer amount of knowledge you must have to be able to properly experience the environment.

You cannot touch any of the animals, and it is advised to stay at least two metres away, unless the animals come closer out of their own choice.

You cannot bring anything into the Galápagos (e.g. animals, fresh fruit and vegetables) so as not to introduce invasive species and ruin the natural environment. You also cannot take anything out of the Galápagos (e.g. sand, shells, fauna) - this will be checked by sniffer dogs at the airport.

You may not leave the marked trails on any of the islands so as not to disturb any natural habitats including nests and mating sites.


ONE WEEK ITINERARY FOR THE Galápagos

Coral I and II through Go Galápagos offer four itineraries: A, B, C and D. A and C both last 4 days and 3 nights; B and D last 5 days and 4 nights. Each itinerary visits different parts of the archipelago.

We chose itineraries B and C, to make an 8-day and 7-night expedition from Wednesday to Wednesday. We felt that B and C offered the most varied experiences, visiting the largest number of islands. You can view all the possible itineraries here.

Itinerary B + C

Go Galápagos arranges your flights from Quito or Guayaquil to match the departure times of the cruise. We flew out of Quito via Guayaquil to Baltra Airport, departing at 8:04am and arriving at 9:48am in the Galápagos (which are one hour behind mainland Ecuador). Everyone on our cruise was on the same flight.

We were met at the airport by a Go Galápagos guide, who took us on a bus ride from the airport down to the ferry terminal on Baltra to cross over to Santa Cruz Island. Baltra Island only has the airport, so even if you aren’t doing a cruise, you’ll still need to take the bus and ferry to Santa Cruz.

On Santa Cruz Island, a panga (dinghy) met us and our luggage and took us out on a twenty-minute ride to meet our beautiful boats anchored further out in the deeper water: home for the next week.

As we arrived on board, we were greeted by our crew, given a safety briefing and an overview of what to expect from our itinerary and then shown to our rooms where our luggage was waiting for us. After a welcome lunch, we immediately jumped into our first activity – and then it was non-stop after that!

Below, you’ll find a day-by-day detailed guide to everything we did:


DAY 1 – SANTA CRUZ ISLAND

Activity 1 + 2: arrivals from Baltra airport

Lunch: welcome buffet lunch in the restaurant

Activity 3: visit to the Highlands Tortoise Reserve

We departed the boat on the pangas and returned to Santa Cruz Island, where we boarded a thirty-minute bus ride into the heart of the island. Along the way, we saw some local villages and an elementary school (I had no idea people actually lived out here!). At the Highlands Tortoise Reserve, our guide walked us through the reserve, spotting the famous giant tortoises of the Galápagos. Although the tortoises here are not in the wild, they are well cared for on spacious land and a small research centre and restaurant offers a chance to view and touch shells of the tortoises.

jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)
jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)
jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)
jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)
jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)

Family photo 🙂

jana meerman highlands tortoise reserve galapagos (2)

The tortoises hang out in ponds to stay cool

Activity 4: a walk through a lava tunnel

The archipelago of the Galápagos is entirely volcanic made. Each island is a volcano, most of them active. Much of the landscapes thus are a result of volcanic eruptions, and many walks will cross lava fields that define this incredible environment, including what animals and fauna grow and thrive here! On the Highlands Tortoise Reserve, you have the chance to walk underground through a lava tunnel, formed by an eruption and a flow of lava on Santa Cruz Island.

jana meerman lava tunnel santa cruz island galapagos

Dinner: seated dinner in the restaurant

jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (2)

Frigates and the moon


DAY 2 – ISABELA ISLAND & FERNANDINA ISLAND

Activity 1: panga ride along Isabela Island

After a nighttime cruise north of the equator around Isabela Island, we arrived in Vicente Roca Point. Our first activity of the day saw us in little pangas cruising the coastline, and we were incredibly lucky to spot all the expected animals: blue-footed boobies, noddies, pelicans, penguins, flightless cormorants, turtles, marine iguanas, sea lions. The ocean currents in this bay bring plenty of life making this one of the hotspots for spotting wildlife.

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (1)

Early mornings in the Galápagos

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)
jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)
jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)

Marine iguanas

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)

Our first sea lion

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)

Blue-footed boobie

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (2)

Back to the boats

Activity 2: deep water snorkelling at Vicente Roca Point

With the taster of the panga ride, we prepared for our first snorkelling expedition. Most people opt to wear wetsuits as the currents can be cool out here, however I found the water pleasant and chose not wear a wetsuit during my trip! Deep water snorkelling means you jump off the sides of the panga instead of wading in from the beach and we found ourselves immediately surrounded by plenty of fish varieties, as well as got to spot all the animals we’d seen from the panga now under water and in their natural habitat. We swam with sea lions, turtles, fish, marine iguanas and even spotted a rare ray!

jana meerman turtles snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman turtles snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman turtles snorkelling galapagos (2)

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant

Activity 3: deep water snorkeling at Espinosa Point

After lunch, we cruised to our next spot where it was time for another snorkel. Once again jumping off the sides of the panga, this afternoon’s snorkelling gave us the chance to swim with marine iguanas, flightless cormorants hunting for their lunch, Galápagos penguins and of course, plenty of turtles. The quality of snorkelling out here is unsurpassed, offering such a rich density and variety of marine life, completely unbothered by human presence, allowing us to witness them in their stunning natural environments with their normal behaviours.

jana meerman galapagos (1)
jana meerman galapagos (1)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (3)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (3)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (3)

Marine iguana feeding

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (3)

Marine iguana

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (3)

Flightless cormorant hunting

Activity 4: walk on Fernandina Island

The chance to go for a walk across the exquisite Fernandina Island got us up close and personal with recent lava fields and the lava cactus, which are the first to grow on a recent lava flow, as well as an abundance of wildlife including hundreds of marine iguanas, sea lions, yellow finches, pelicans and even a Galápagos hawk, the top predator of the islands. As we rode the pangas back to the boat, we were the luckiest people ever to be escorted back by a whole pod of dolphins who jumped and played in the waves with us as the sun began to set over Fernandina.

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (2)

Galápagos hawk, the islands' top predator

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

The volcanic land of Fernandina

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Lava cactus

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Marine iguanas

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Pelican

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Sea lion

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Marine iguanas

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Baby sea lion

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

A curious sea lion

jana meerman fernandina island galapagos (3)

Yellow finch

Dinner: BBQ dinner on the sun deck at sunset

jana meerman galapagos sunset (2)

DAY 3 – ISABELA ISLAND

Activity 1: walk at Urbina Bay

We started our day early with a panga ride out to Urbina Bay on Isabela Island, where we landed on the beach and trekked inland to spot giant tortoises (many of them quite young and small still!), majestic land iguanas munching in the bushes. Isabela Island is actually a cluster of five volcanoes that were joined together by seismic activity and lava flows, so it’s a hotspot for wildlife and fauna.

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (1)
jana meerman isabela island galapagos (1)

A baby (20 years old) giant tortoise

jana meerman isabela island galapagos (1)
jana meerman isabela island galapagos (1)

Activity 2: snorkelling in Urbina Bay

After our morning walk, we stripped down to our swimsuits and donned snorkelling gear for our first off-the-beach snorkel session. While I prefer deep water snorkelling off the pangas so that you jump straight into the water without wading through the sand – and there tends to be more animals further out from directly on the beach – it was still a gorgeous swim along the coast spotting turtles and shoals of fish grazing the coral on the shores.

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant

Activity 3: deep water snorkeling in Tagus Cove

During lunch, we sailed to our next destination on Isabela Island where we jumped back into the pangas for an afternoon of deep-water snorkelling where we swam with loads of turtles and best of all, the Galápagos penguins that call western Isabela Island home. The penguins were so curious and have no fear, darting in and out of our legs as we swam along the coast.

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (6)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (6)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (6)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (6)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (6)

Activity 4: panga ride around Tagus Cove and walk to Darwin Lake

After a hot shower (the water on the boat is desalinated straight from the ocean!), we took a panga ride around Tagus Cove before heading onto land where a steep set of wooden steps past graffiti-covered rocks from the times of the pirates led us to Darwin Lake, a massive salt-water crater lake, the water source of which scientists still can’t determine. It was here that we learned about the palo santo tree, the sap of which is used as a natural insect repellent and is said to ward off the bad energy and attract good energy! They call it the incense of the Galápagos.

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (1)

Blue-footed boobie

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (1)

Pelican

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (1)

Our boats moored in Tagus Cove

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (1)

Our home: Coral I

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (1)

A Galápagos penguin

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (6)

Climbing up to Darwin's Lake

jana meerman tagus cove galapagos (6)

Darwin's Lake

Dinner: formal seated dinner before the greatest sunset of the cruise

jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)

DAY 4 – SANTIAGO ISLAND

Unfortunately, I was wiped out with exhaustion on day 4 and spent the entire day asleep in my cabin. However, I have outlined the itinerary below for those of you who might choose to book this trip and have included a few photos that my parents took while out on the various activities of the day.

Activity 1: hike from Egas Port

This long two-hour hike took everyone across a black volcanic sand beach, one visited by Darwin in 1835. The highlight here is spotting the bright red crabs called Sally Lightfoot Crabs dancing across the black sand.

Activity 2: snorkeling in Egas Port

From the beach, they then snorkeled with the resident fur seals of Santiago Island.

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant

Activity 3: walk in Sullivan Bay

After lunch, a shorter walk in Sullivan Bay, the youngest lava flows of the Galápagos from the late 19th century show off the new fauna growing in post-eruption.

Activity 4: snorkeling in Sullivan Bay

After the second walk of the day, another beach snorkeling session followed.

jana meerman santiago island galapagos (1)
jana meerman santiago island galapagos (1)
jana meerman santiago island galapagos (1)
jana meerman santiago island galapagos (1)

DAY 5 – SANTA CRUZ ISLAND & NORTH SEYMOUR ISLAND

Activity 1: walk on Bachas Beach

Possibly the prettiest beach we had visited so far, the pure white sand of Bachas Beach is home to small ponds where flamingos come to visit and feed. We started extra early this day and watched the pink clouds light up the morning sky. The remnants of a World War II barge wreck can also be found on the beach here.

jana meerman bachas beach galapagos (1)
jana meerman bachas beach galapagos (1)
jana meerman bachas beach galapagos (1)

Itinerary B ends on Day 5 after the first activity of the day. Those passengers who are leaving after Itinerary B return to the boat from Bachas Beach and then depart for the airport.

For those of us who stayed on for a double itinerary (which makes for a one-week cruise), we continued as below:

Activity 2: visit to Twin Craters and Adriano Cabrera Farm

We returned to the shores of Santa Cruz Island where a small bus took us to the heart of the island where twin craters can be found. The craters are not volcanic summits, but rather sink holes as a result of hot lava flowing beneath them; they are estimated to be approximately a million years old, the same age as Santa Cruz Island. It is surrounding these craters where you can find the sclesia trees, featured in David Attenborough’s BBC documentary about the Galápagos. They are in fact not trees – instead they are a gigantic relative of the dandelion!

After the craters, we continued driving into the town of Bella Vista on Santa Cruz where we visited Adriano Cabrera’s farm to witness how a local Galápagian lives, growing and producing everything his family could need, including sugarcane, coffee, rum, chocolate and many kinds of fruits and vegetables that all thrive in the mild island climate.

jana meerman santa cruz island galapagos (1)

The incredible forests of Santa Cruz Island

jana meerman santa cruz island galapagos (1)

The "toilet paper" tree

jana meerman santa cruz island galapagos (3)

The scalesia, or giant dandelions

jana meerman santa cruz island galapagos (3)

Cocoa

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant with all the new passengers for Itinerary C

Activity 3: walk on North Seymour Island

With the new passengers, we sailed to the shores of North Seymour Island where we went for a long walk through the varied landscape spotting nesting frigates and blue-footed boobies and their adorable fluffy babies. Further inland, we were lucky enough to witness two marine iguanas feasting on a cactus, one of the ways they’ve evolved to survive in the harsh environments of the Galápagos.

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (1)

Mama frigate

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (1)

Baby nesting frigate

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (1)

Sea lion

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (1)

Baby blue-footed boobie and mama

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (1)

The blue feet come in later as a result of their diet

jana meerman north seymour island galapagos (8)

2 marine iguanas dueling over a juicy cactus

Dinner: buffet dinner in the restaurant

Where we anchored for the night is a fabulous place for spotting sharks and so after dinner in the dark, we all crowded the decks to see the majestic white animals gliding through the ocean below our boat.

jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)

Frigates under the moon

jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)

DAY 6 – SANTA CRUZ ISLAND & MOSQUERA ISLET

Activity 1: visit to Charles Darwin Research Station

The day started with a panga ride and then a long drive across Santa Cruz Island out to Puerto Ayora where the wonderful Charles Darwin Research Station is located. Here, along with all the scientific research undertaken, they run a special breeding program of tortoises to preserve the fragile species of the Galápagos. It was here where Lonesome George, the last of his kind of species of tortoise, also spent the final decades of his life and where his preserved body can now be viewed in a special climate-controlled room.

jana meerman charles darwin research station galapagos (1)
jana meerman charles darwin research station galapagos (1)
jana meerman charles darwin research station galapagos (1)
jana meerman charles darwin research station galapagos (1)

Activity 2: visit to Puerto Ayora

After we left the Research Station, we had some free time in the main city of Santa Cruz Island, Puerto Ayora, which is where all the hotels are located and there are restaurants and souvenir shops to visit.

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant

During lunch as we cruised to our next stop, a huge pod of dolphins played and swam alongside us!

jana meerman dolphins galapagos

Activity 3: walk on Mosquera Islet

This tiny islet is between North Seymour and Baltra Island and is a haven for sea lions as well as frigates and pelicans. The white sand is full of ground-covering fauna and the sand is pure white.

jana meerman mosquera islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman mosquera islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman mosquera islet galapagos (1)

A pelican flew right up to me!

jana meerman mosquera islet galapagos (1)

Activity 4: snorkeling off Mosquera Islet

The water here is exceptionally clear, and we finished our day with a snorkel along the coastline spotting colourful shoals of fish and, best of all, two majestic spotted manta rays - an extremely rare sight and unfortunately my GoPro died just as we reached them in the deeper waters. I’ll remember that moment in my memory forever, though.

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)

Boarding the panga

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (2)

Dinner: buffet dinner in the restaurant

jana meerman sunset galapagos

DAY 7 – SOUTH PLAZA ISLET & SANTA FE ISLAND

Activity 1: walk on South Plaza Islet

We went for a very long morning walk all around the exquisite South Plaza Islet, a little plot of land home to both land and marine iguanas and hundreds of birds calling the steep cliffs facing Santa Cruz Island home. The hardy cacti call this islet home, and sleepy sea lions doze on the cliff ledge, all waiting to be photographed and visited.

jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)

Red-footed boobies

jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)

Baby and mama sea lion

jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)

Coral I seen from the islet

jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)
jana meerman south plaza islet galapagos (1)

Yellow finch

Lunch: buffet lunch in the restaurant

Activity 2: snorkelling off Santa Fe Island

We didn’t have a second morning activity as our walk was long and we need the time to cruise to our next destination: the stunningly clear waters off Santa Fe Island that offer the best snorkeling with sea lions. We swam for an hour with these playful creatures off the coast, twirling in and around us, before venturing into deeper waters where gentle turtles could be spotted. This was one of the clearest snorkels we’ve had so far.

jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (4)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (4)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (4)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (4)
jana meerman snorkelling galapagos (4)

Activity 3: walk on Santa Fe Island

After our snorkel, we made way to land to visit the resident sea lion colony of Santa Fe Island’s white beaches, as well as spotting more land iguanas and giant cacti.

jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)
jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)
jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)
jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)
jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)
jana meerman santa fe island galapagos (2)

Dinner: formal seated dinner in the restaurant

Our final dinner on board was a formal affair, with candles on the tables and everyone dressed to the nines. The accompanying sunset did not disappoint, and I was already feeling nostalgic for the incredible adventure we’d undertaken and the knowledge that we had to disembark the next morning, leaving this haven on the ocean behind.

jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)
jana meerman sunset galapagos (1)

DAY 8 – LOBOS ISLAND

Activity 1: walk on Lobos Island

A very early morning - to give us time for a final activity before leaving for the airport - saw us walking along Lobos Island, the best island in the entire archipelago to spot mating and nesting blue-footed boobies and frigates. This was a special way to finish the trip, in peace and quiet watching these brilliantly coloured baby birds and their parents.

jana meerman blue footed boobies galapagos (2)
jana meerman blue footed boobies galapagos (2)
jana meerman blue footed boobies galapagos (2)
jana meerman blue footed boobies galapagos (2)
jana meerman blue footed boobies galapagos (2)

A mating dance


RETURNING TO QUITO

After our walk, we returned to the boat to pack up our belongings and say goodbye to the crew. We cruised to our final destination: the harbour on San Cristobal Island, where we took our final panga ride to land where a bus took us to the tiny little one-departure-gate airport.

Getting to have been so entrenched in the diversity and richness of life in the Galápagos, one of the world’s greatest places for wildlife viewing, has been one of the most surreal and privileged experiences of my life. I cannot thank the crew of Coral I enough for making this trip one of the most special memories I will carry forever.

We flew back with Avianca from San Cristobal again via Guayaquil to Quito with the other passengers from our cruise. Returning to the mainland felt strange and the entire week felt almost like a dream – thankfully I’ve got thousands of photos to remind me that I really did undertake this incredible adventure.

If you have any questions about visiting the Galápagos, please don’t hesitate to reach out. This was the most special week.


PIN THIS POST TO REFER BACK TO LATER!

Pinterest - Galapagos
Pinterest - Galapagos
Follow:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.